Educational Exhibiting Mobile Trailers

After attending many educational events and conferences, I noticed a trend of educational exhibit trailers. I’m a big fan of mobile education, especially when it’s experiential and hands on. Mobile learning (not digital) helps students absorb information differently than traditional classroom at-desk learning. Trailers like there outside of conferences can be towed to schools for on-site field trips or to create temporary outdoor classrooms for contextual environmental learning. I could go on about this topic!

The educational trailers listed below include a mobile greenhouse, aquaponic lab, anti-poaching station, mobile solar power and education, and interactive agricultural exhibits!

Mobile Aquaponics Learning Lab Trailer

“Out of the very humble beginnings of a tiny, dark, crowded ag mech shop at Collins Middle School, Larry Acock and his team of young eighth grade boys have emerged year after year with some very spectacular projects.

One year they did a handicapped-accessible deer stand with elevator for disabled veterans. Last year they made the first mobile calf cooler of its kind. And this year, they topped by constructing a mobile aquaponics lab.” – Corsicana Daily Sun

Wall of Shame Anti-Poaching Traveling Exhibit

“The Operation Game Thief Wall of Shame Exhibit, is a display that acts as a valuable means of advertising the Operation Game Thief message with the public.” – Operation Game Thief

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Architectural Models and 3D Prints

Along my travels, I’ve come across a lot of different architectural models and 3D printed works. With the rate of 3D technology improving, I can easily see 3D printed houses on a commercial scale in coming years. The models I found most interesting lean toward a futuristic design. A type of design that is self-contained and often includes food production and passive energy elements.

Below you’ll find futuristic buildings, 3D printed products, and a few other interesting models!

Architectural Models at A&M University

These were some of the models at the school of architecture at Texas A&M University. The first was that of Frank Lloyd Wright’s ‘The Robie House,’ built by two students. Next to that house was an artistic architectural flow chart of the school’s disciplines. Very cool! After my tour I went to the student center and found a three-dimensional map with raised buildings and braille for visually impaired people to use to orient themselves on campus.

Learn more about my Texas A&M Landscape Architecture tour.

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Domes and Rounded Structures List

You could say my architectural preference is round. As documented on my travels and adventures, I came across lots of dome homes, rounded buildings, curved greenhouses, portable structures, and many other circular constructions!

Below is a hefty list of rounded structures to support the success and longevity of circular design.

The Domes, (AKA Baggins End Innovative Housing)

The Domes, (AKA Baggins End Innovative Housing) is an on-campus cooperative housing community designed by Ron Swenson. Consisting of 14 polyurethane-insulated fiberglass domes located in the Sustainable Research Area at the western end of Orchard Park, it is home to 26 UCD students. – The Domes Webpage

Learn more about my Muir Commons Cohousing & Davis Domes visit.

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Taylor’s Personal Projects List

This is a collection of my personal projects, most of which are gardening-related. I also have a few projects related to vermiculture, a hobby I picked up years ago trying to improve my waste practices. Check out each project blog post to see more details and follow my creation process.

Project: The [RE]verse Pitch Competition

I decided to participate in the [RE]verse Pitch Competition through the city of Austin. It’s an entrepreneurial competition like Shark Tank, only the difference is that materials are pitched in reverse to the entrepreneurs. I created vermicomposting bags made from Austin Eastcider’s excess sugar Supersacks. 

Learn more about my experience.

Project: Worm Sifter

I built a worm casting sifter, or a panning trommel, to help better separate my worms from my castings. I found a worm casting sifter DIY video online and recreated it. Overall, I would recommend a different style and have it mechanically powered instead of manual.

Check out my worm casting sifter process.

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Personal Project: Worm Sifter

I took on another personal project which was to build a worm casting sifter, or a panning trommel, to better separate my worms and my castings. I found this worm casting sifter DIY video from Planted by Chris, which I followed to build my very own sifter. After I completed my sifter, I would recommend probably a different style with an electric motor. This works better than by hand, but still requires lots of work and sifting for small juveniles/eggs.

I started off by buying the video’s purchase list requirements to make the sifter. This included mesh wiring, PVC pipes and joints, bots and washers, and extra buckets. I cut the pipes using PVC snips and dry-fit the rotation frame together. This was partially done during the snowmagedon. I had to wait post-storm to get certain parts because hardware stores were sold out of PVC for plumbing issues.

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My Polar Vortex Snowed-in Experience

Much like many, many, many other Texans, I went through polar storm Uri hunkering down at home and making do with what we could. I was fortunate enough to have roommates, supplies, and power – even though we lost water.

The snow was a novelty at first, but became old really quickly. I took some photographs to document this freakishly extreme natural weather event. Our neighborhood was snowed in like many others, and nearby major streets became post-apocalyptic stuck car graveyards.

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